In this episode, I interview Trisha Craig who helps parents and students create music resumes, regardless of if they wish to pursue music in college or not. We talk about the benefits of pursing music, the components of a music resume, and the scholarship opportunities with music.

Audio file 

TrishaMusicResumes.mp3 

Transcript 

Kamila 

Hey college kids. 

Kamila 

Today’s episode is a bit different from what I usually do. 

Kamila 

I’ll be interviewing Trisha Craig and she helps students high school students build music resumes for college. 

Kamila 

Whether you’re applying to a music school specifically or applying to a music program within a larger university or larger college, so I’m just here to remind you to subscribe so you know when you. 

Kamila 

Episodes are released and enjoy. 

Trisha 

Second hey college kids. 

Kamila 

Welcome back to my podcast. 

Kamila 

Who cares about College in today’s episode I’ll be interviewing Trisha, so if you could introduce yourself. 

Trisha 

Well hi, I am Trisha Craig. 

Trisha 

I am a classically trained flutist. 

Trisha 

I’m a flutist and conductor and I have a business called music build lives and I coach music students on leveraging their musical training to get into college with scholarship money. 

Kamila 

OK, so I said we jump into the questions but I I have like friends who are, you know, in my school like music is a big thing. 

Kamila 

There a lot of my friends are in band or orchestra and do like bands and orchestra outside of school as well. 

Kamila 

And like a lot of them have like seriously considered becoming like a musician down the road, they just don’t. 

Kamila 

They know it’s like. 

Kamila 

It’s really hard, like most people don’t end up doing it they. 

Kamila 

Just like give. 

Kamila 

Up you have to be really passionate about music to stick to. 

Kamila 

Stick to it. 

Kamila 

Throughout your life. 

Kamila 

So like if you could just like give quick advice as to how you know that you should actually pursue music. 

Trisha 

Well, first I just I, you know, I we weren’t going to talk about this, but I also have a business coaching creative people on the business side of their life. 

Trisha 

And the the the. 

Trisha 

The fact is that. 

Trisha 

Anything you choose. 

Trisha 

To do it takes. 

Trisha 

It is hard. 

Trisha 

It’s hard to do. 

Trisha 

It’s hard to be a dentist for the rest of your life and to make it, it’s hard to be an accountant for the rest of your life and make it. 

Trisha 

It’s hard to be a pianist, and. 

Trisha 

So, so it’s not true that. 

Trisha 

That that it’s harder than other fields in that realm. 

Trisha 

What what ends up happening is that a lot of musicians just haven’t been. 

Trisha 

Taught any of the entrepreneurial side of what they need to know and those who do know that do really well like they might not be principal in an orchestra, or they might not be the leading opera singer in a major company, but they still can have a a fulfilling career doing that so. 

Trisha 

The but I I I recommend when it comes to those students who are really doing great with music who think they might like to do that as a career. 

Trisha 

I say go to school for music and it it will. 

Trisha 

It will pan out into something. 

Trisha 

It’ll lead to something and. 

Trisha 

Uh, and to be open minded about what that career will look like. 

Trisha 

I mean that I I say, if they’re thinking they might like to do that, then honestly, you know I used to work at a Conservatory and I had. 

Trisha 

I knew people who were whose parents were like, well, you can audition to play cello here, but I want you to go to Business School that. 

Trisha 

Yeah, the the fact is that if you go to school for music or if you go to school for something that you love doing that you’re good at, you’re going to do better in school and and than you would if you went to something that you don’t really care about. 

Trisha 

And also I have to say that. 

Trisha 

Right now, law, schools and and medical schools are actively recruiting music students for their programs. 

Trisha 

Yes, and that is because musicians know stuff that other students do not learn and the list is extraordinary. 

Trisha 

So if you just look at your friends who are in in orchestra, for example, they’ve been practicing something to gain that skill every single day since. 

Trisha 

They were about 6. 

Trisha 

So they know how to practice to learn this skill. 

Trisha 

How many of your other student friends have done that? 

Trisha 

And so what’s happening is learning skill has become something that people don’t know how to do, and so when you get to medical school and you have to learn how to do, you know open heart surgery and you don’t know how to learn that skill. 

Trisha 

Medical schools are having a very difficult time teaching people how to learn skills, so they’re so there’s that. 

Trisha 

There’s also we musicians get critiqued every single week in our private lesson. 

Trisha 

In our. 

Trisha 

I mean, we get shredded and ask your friends what’s the local entities they had and they will tell you so we get shredded in every single lesson we take every single rehearsal, even at the professional level you do a concert. 

Trisha 

It doesn’t matter how famous you are, there’s there are people out there writing articles saying Oh my gosh, they’re awful. 

Trisha 

Their tone was terrible or so. 

Trisha 

We know how to take it. 

Trisha 

And when it comes to law school and medical school, people with music degrees are totally ready to be like, Yep, I messed that up. 

Trisha 

That was not good. 

Trisha 

I know I have to go back and rewrite that thing or I have to redo that research or I have to retry that skill and music students are the ones who are like OK, I’m on it and they just go back and do it. 

Trisha 

Other students are. 

Trisha 

Are not qualified. 

Trisha 

To handle that kind of pressure, and they crash and burn and the list goes on and on and on. Music students from the time that they’re young are dealing one-on-one with professionals in their field. 

Trisha 

And other students aren’t aren’t doing that, so they don’t know inherently how to deal with those kind of interactions. 

Trisha 

Those kind of professional conversations. 

Trisha 

I mean, I’ll bet that your music friends. 

Trisha 

Are able to speak in class more articulately than many of the other students in your class. 

Trisha 

They’re able to interact with teachers better and and and and come up with ideas on the spot. 

Trisha 

Music students are taught how to handle pressure right on stage, and you know when you’re trying to learn to do medical procedures or how to be a lawyer. 

Trisha 

A lot of students are just not able to handle that. 

Trisha 

Like anymore and music students can. 

Trisha 

And oh oh, there’s more. 

Trisha 

And I didn’t write down these this list I could. 

Trisha 

I could go on all day about this kind of stuff because they’re there. 

Trisha 

Oh, you know what another big one is and this one my I do this with my clients. 

Trisha 

We go through a whole list of things that they’ve learned from music. 

Trisha 

Then we translate it into other fields and one of them that everybody kind of laughs at, especially the men, the young men. 

Trisha 

They say. 

Trisha 

Well, I know how to wear a tuxedo and tie a bow tie to Zac Brown. 

Trisha 

And it does. 

Trisha 

We music students have been having to wear concert attire, appropriate clothing, and then for those of us who did marching band or winter percussion, we have to wear a uniform. 

Trisha 

We’ve been doing that since we were kids, little kids, and when you go to study you know anything where there’s a, uh, a clothing. 

Trisha 

Requirement on an appearance requirement. 

Trisha 

You know, like if you’re going to be a chef and you have to wear the jacket and there’s pushback, people don’t want to have to wear what they’re told to wear or they don’t want to have to conform. 

Trisha 

But music students you. 

Trisha 

Know even even to go get a job. 

Trisha 

At an ice cream. 

Trisha 

Stand and they’re like OK you have to wear this cap and this shirt. 

Trisha 

Like awesome, it’s not a marching band uniform I’m, I’m cool. 

Trisha 

I’ll wear that. 

Trisha 

And the music students are the ones who never complain about having to wear that that item. 

Trisha 

So music students are so hireable and I actually have a friend a colleague who has degrees in saxophone was teaching in the public. 

Trisha 

Schools, and he realized that he had a passion for animals and he is in his early 30s and he just got into veterinary school at Cornell. 

Trisha 

Based on his musical training and now he’s studying to become a vet with a big honkin scholarship. 

Trisha 

Wow, so music students are not. 

Trisha 

I tell the parents music kids are not normal, your kid. 

Trisha 

All the things that you see when you go to marching band competitions or orchestra concerts or Allstate. 

Trisha 

All of those kids, all the stuff that they’re doing, all the interaction, the practicing the knowing to be appropriate. 

Trisha 

And to strive for excellence and to work as part of. 

Trisha 

A team all. 

Trisha 

Of those things, are music specific and outside of. 

Trisha 

Those that musical realm schools are really finding that that students are not qualified to deal with a lot of a lot of those kinds. 

Trisha 

A lot of things that they’re required to deal with, especially as they go on to grad school, and so grad schools are literally throwing money at musicians because. 

Trisha 

They know that we can take it that we’re smart, that we can handle the pressure, that we know how to learn skills, all those things. 

Trisha 

So if you think that you want to go to school for violin and you’re not sure if maybe you’d prefer to be a doctor, go to school for violin. 

Trisha 

And then you can go to medical school later, I promise. 

Kamila 

OK, so that’s a whole. 

Kamila 

Rabbit hole we can go. 

Kamila 

Down had no idea music students were so horrible, but I want to ask one more thing before we jump into. 

Kamila 

Like creating a music resume so. 

Kamila 

One thing my friends like talk about the ones that are interested in music. 

Kamila 

They really love music and they can’t imagine their life without it. 

Kamila 

And the thing they’re struggling is with is. 

Kamila 

Should I make it like a career or should I make it like a hobby or something? 

Kamila 

You know stuff like that and I’m telling them like oh, how hard is it to like? 

Kamila 

Again, you said in every career to like to make it to the top. 

Kamila 

It’s really hard, but they’re saying like with music schools for a lot of schools like it doesn’t really matter where you go to school. 

Kamila 

So once you get your first job, you build yourself up from there. 

Kamila 

Once you get your first job at least. 

Kamila 

But for like. 

Kamila 

Music schools like Juilliard and I always forget. 

Kamila 

The other one is like Juilliard and the other really. 

Kamila 

Big one they say like if you don’t get into those schools, then you’re probably never going to make it to one of those. 

Kamila 

Like bigger orchestras. 

Kamila 

Bigger like UM. 

Kamila 

Bands if you, if that’s what you want to pursue. 

Kamila 

’cause they like most of those people, musicians who go from there are from those like big schlich, those really famous Juilliard, the conservatories. 

Kamila 

So like. 

Kamila 

I guess I’m asking, how do you if the probability is so low of you actually getting into like the highest conservative like not Conservatory, but like orchestra out of college like how do you know you have the passion for music to pursue it that intently? 

Kamila 

Or just keep it as a hobby throughout your life? 

Kamila 

How did you know? 

Kamila 

How did you know that you wanted to pursue music, for example? 

Trisha 

I just I just knew that I wanted to. 

Trisha 

When I was looking at colleges and I was thinking I was thinking of either studying music or English at the time and and here’s The funny thing. 

Trisha 

I was really good at biology and the Science department chair was like you should go to school for biology. 

Trisha 

And I laughed. 

Trisha 

And I was like, what do you do with a biology degree like now that everything changed? 

Trisha 

And everybody, like biology, is like such a cool thing. 

Trisha 

But back then I was like I couldn’t even imagine what you do with that. 

Trisha 

But so I knew that I wanted to increase my musical I I didn’t want to stop and I wanted to keep working at it and so I chose to go to school for music and I just sort of I. 

Trisha 

I don’t know. 

Trisha 

At first I thought I wanted to be a band director and. 

Trisha 

I changed my my my degree. 

Trisha 

I mean, that’s the other thing you go to college. 

Trisha 

And you can change your mind, but so I pursued music. 

Trisha 

First, because I knew that it would be hard to go back into it if I didn’t do it first. 

Trisha 

It’s hard to get back in music because you have to get that skill back. 

Trisha 

So that’s how I chose it. 

Trisha 

I challenge your assumption or assertion that everybody in the top orchestras went to Juilliard here. 

Kamila 

I don’t know like that’s all I hear from my friends or like Juilliard and the other one. 

Trisha 

No, they’re they’re wrong. 

Trisha 

They’re wrong. 

Trisha 

In fact, people and Julia is a phenomenal place, and I have plans to apply there, so I’m not going to diss Juilliard. 

Trisha 

And it’s a great place for very specific people, but also it’s a great place to. 

Trisha 

Now and there are lots of people who went to Juilliard and then crashed afterwards because they have been playing at such a high level from such a young age that they’re already like world class level. 

Trisha 

Practically, when they get to Juilliard and then with all of that intensive work and all of that pressure and everything, they graduate and they’re just like done. 

Trisha 

So a lot of people in I’m from New England. 

Trisha 

We’ve got the Boston Symphony Orchestra right here. 

Trisha 

I I can’t give percentages or statistics, but I’m certain that if we got a list of every single person from the Boston Symphony Orchestra and looked at where their training came from, I’m certain that it is not. 

Trisha 

A high percentage of Juilliard grads, so that’s the first thing that being able to to play is more important than getting into Juilliard. 

Trisha 

You’re not going to get into Julia. 

Trisha 

I mean people some. 

Trisha 

People get into Juilliard, but probably someone who’s like, I wonder if I should major music. 

Trisha 

They’re not. 

Trisha 

They’re already not quite at that level. 

Trisha 

Like you know, if you’re Juilliard bound. 

Trisha 

And so there are lots and lots of really amazing training grounds in the US and beyond, and so with lots and lots of really wonderful options to combine majors or to study, you know, outside of just. 

Trisha 

Violin, you might want to go into musicology or composition or other things. 

Trisha 

There are other things you can do in music and I would anyone anyone who’s having that conversation honestly tell them to have come have a free chat with me and I will give them a pep talk because because they need. 

Trisha 

The the that question is based in fear. 

Trisha 

I never hear anyone say oh I wonder if I should bother to study accounting. 

Trisha 

Will I be able to make it or or should I become a surgeon? 

Trisha 

I don’t know if I can get into that to that medical school or something like that, people. 

Trisha 

Are just like I’m. 

Trisha 

Going to try and you know with music. 

Trisha 

It’s the same thing you’re really good. 

Trisha 

At the tuba. 

Trisha 

And you think you’d like to study it at the college level? 

Trisha 

Then do because it will lead to other things. 

Trisha 

Either you’ll become a great tuba player and be in a military band, or the Symphony or whatever it is, or you’ll find other opportunities or use that musical training to go elsewhere so it’s. 

Trisha 

It is, uh, you you can’t. 

Trisha 

You can’t lose honestly. 

Trisha 

More so now than ever before. 

Trisha 

I would say just by looking at what other? 

Trisha 

Students have for their experiences that that, like I said, colleges are finding that there’s quite a challenge in. 

Trisha 

Teaching the typical student. 

Trisha 

And and but it’s easy to work with the music students ’cause they’ve dealt with a lot more so. 

Trisha 

How do you know if you have? 

Trisha 

The passion, well you you try. 

Trisha 

Right? 

Trisha 

You try that, I mean, you just you just try and you go for it and and and when we’re talking about all the questions for this. 

Trisha 

For this conversation about the resumes we can we can touch on that more because there are things that they can be trying now that will tell them if they, if they love doing that. 

Trisha 

A lot of my clients. 

Trisha 

Didn’t know that they wanted to major in music until they went to a high end of music camp in the summer and they went to music camp. 

Trisha 

There was one student that. 

Trisha 

That had a had a meeting with me after having attended music camp and she was going to be a senior. 

Trisha 

She it was like. 

Trisha 

August of her senior year and she said, you know, I kind of thought I was going to go to a Business School or something and she goes. 

Trisha 

But I went to music camp and gosh. 

Trisha 

I just wish college could be like that and. 

Trisha 

I was like music. 

Trisha 

College is like. 

Trisha 

That like that’s what music school is. 

Trisha 

It’s the same type of thing and they ended up going on to become a really great music educator at actually here in New Hampshire. 

Trisha 

And they they realized it after going to a music. 

Trisha 

Uh, music training ground. 

Kamila 

Yeah, disclaimer going into this episode. 

Kamila 

Everyone listening covering so if I sound dead or nasally or whatever, that’s why. 

Kamila 

So I did happen sick for several days. 

Trisha 

Hope you feel really well really soon. 

Kamila 

I hope. 

Kamila 

It’s getting better, I’m just recovering alright, so let’s get into the questions. 

Kamila 

So first and I’m coming like I usually have background knowledge on this kind of stuff. 

Kamila 

I don’t know what a music resume is. 

Kamila 

I don’t know anything about, despite have like all my friends. 

Kamila 

Being into music, but so number one. 

Kamila 

What is a music resume? 

Kamila 

And like how do colleges view it? Is it the same as Git is deciding whether to accept the student athlete to play like D1 or D2 at your school? 

Kamila 

So how do colleges view it and what is a music resume? 

Trisha 

Well, let’s start with what a music resume is. 

Trisha 

It’s literally a list of all the things that you’ve done as as a music student and it’s so it’s music. 

Trisha 

Specific so on the college applications there’s also the, you know the student, the student, resume your your activities resume. 

Trisha 

And this is. 

Trisha 

Similar to that, but it’s just all of the music related activities all in one place and. 

Trisha 

That can go to the music, I mean to the in with your application. 

Trisha 

But what I really teach my clients to do is to create a relationship with the music department at the schools that you’re interested in. 

Trisha 

So athletes do the same thing, right? 

Trisha 

They get they they have they go. 

Trisha 

They have the. 

Trisha 

Coaches come look at them and all these things that the athletes do. 

Trisha 

The music department. 

Trisha 

In many instances does similar stuff, but they don’t. 

Trisha 

They don’t leave you, bring it to them so you know there’s not this. 

Trisha 

There’s not as much recruitment, although there is recruitment as well, but. 

Trisha 

So it’s all about. 

Trisha 

Being able to fill the need that the school has and if they have a need for your instrument and what you do at the level that you do it at, then it can help you in the college process and it can help you. 

Trisha 

With scholarship money did I? 

Trisha 

Did I answer that question? 

Kamila 

Yeah, I think it did a good job. 

Trisha 

I mean, I think the thing to remember when you look at when you look at a school, any school, whether you’re going to. 

Trisha 

Study music or. 

Trisha 

Participate in music. 

Trisha 

When you look at any school they have for example they have sports and so if they don’t have anyone coming there to play field hockey. 

Trisha 

Then they’re not. 

Trisha 

Going to have a field hockey team for long. 

Trisha 

And they can’t lose that team because that’s part of the fabric of the school. 

Trisha 

And the same thing holds true in the music department. 

Trisha 

If they have an orchestra, then they have to fill it, and some schools are finding it difficult to fill their their large ensembles, and So what they’re doing is they’re adding a community element. 

Trisha 

To it, so they might have. 

Trisha 

We might have mostly students and then some adults in the community that join and play in the group. 

Trisha 

They’re like amateur musicians, or if they if the school is near another big music school, they might hire students from that other school to come play in your band or in their orchestra to fill those seats. 

Trisha 

So what they would prefer. 

Trisha 

To do is to have current students to fill all of those spots and and so your music resume if it’s well done. 

Trisha 

And well thought out and and that you’ve done enough things to to. 

Trisha 

To show that you are at a high level, you might be exactly what they need in order to make sure that their orchestra keeps keeps playing and or their choir or their jazz band or their pep band or whatever they have, and so the music department has to be able to bring in people at a certain level who will fill those slots, and so your music. 

Trisha 

It may helps them to see that you’re one of those people. 

Kamila 

And I guess going into like schools looking at music resumes more students that have a high interest in music. 

Kamila 

With every job that every job is going to have different qualifications for a position like expectations that they want so. 

Kamila 

When you’re applying to a school and you want to be part of their music program, even if you want to, just like double major in it or something, you still want to be part of it. 

Kamila 

But for a school to seriously consider you to come and play for them. 

Kamila 

Is there like a certain level you need to reach, like what I wrote was? 

Kamila 

Is there a certain level you need to reach to have, like a valid music resume is? 

Kamila 

There’s like such a thing. 

Kamila 

Are there essential components that you must have? 

Kamila 

I mean, beyond the fact that you need a play instrument or like saying, but are there like really like big essential things that you need to have for school to seriously consider you? 

Trisha 

Yeah, so there’s a big spectrum when we’re talking about every school in America or every school in the world. 

Trisha 

There’s a really big spectrum, so there are some schools that have really, mostly just. 

Trisha 

Activities based music stuff that people complain and so you know clearly that would have a different level. 

Trisha 

Of expectation in order to participate than Juilliard. 

Trisha 

And that’s at the other end of the spectrum, right? 

Trisha 

So but most people. 

Trisha 

And if we talk specifically about students like the friends that you were talking about, really great musicians in a school music program who also play in an ensemble by audition. 

Trisha 

Outside of school. 

Trisha 

Those, that’s like. 

Trisha 

That’s a good standard right there. 

Trisha 

Those kinds of people are going to be able to show that they have the training necessary to play well at the college level, so some of the basics that you know. 

Trisha 

If I were just going to talk to anybody about any school and not necessarily a music major, but maybe. 

Trisha 

Minor or or just leveraging their musical training, I would say that you want to have been taking private lessons. 

Trisha 

That’s important you want to have been in your school music program all the way through high school or as much as possible. 

Trisha 

And you want to have done some things outside of your school music program. 

Trisha 

So that could mean that you got into Allstate. 

Trisha 

Or that could mean that you play at your temple. 

Trisha 

Or your church. 

Trisha 

Right that some some community service types of things that you’ve done. 

Trisha 

Can count I. 

Trisha 

Worked with a young woman. 

Trisha 

Right? 

Trisha 

Who was a good music student good? 

Trisha 

Not not. 

Trisha 

Not groundbreaking, not winning awards? 

Trisha 

Not, but she was a good student and she was involved in her school band all the way through high school and she wanted to go to nursing school. 

Trisha 

She was looking at schools that didn’t have music. 

Trisha 

She wanted to go to nursing school, but what we did was we worked on developing a music resume that it wasn’t. 

Trisha 

Something that anyone at and at a music degree would look at. 

Trisha 

She didn’t. 

Trisha 

She didn’t win anything. 

Trisha 

She didn’t even play first chair. 

Trisha 

Her band, but but she had taken private lessons and she had played on some recitals. 

Trisha 

And So what we did was we put together. 

Trisha 

I call it the Ovation project that I do with some of my clients and we put it together over the summer and she did this thing where she got together a bunch of her music friends and they did a. 

Trisha 

Fundraiser for a nursing organization that raises money for Children that are born addicted. 

Trisha 

In her community, and so through her music, she was able to do this project and she was able to show all kinds of the kinds of experience that we were talking about earlier. 

Trisha 

Being able to interact with people and all of those things and she wasn’t planning on playing music in college. 

Trisha 

But all of this musical stuff. 

Trisha 

Gave her so many ends and she got in everywhere and she got. 

Trisha 

I think she ended up taking one of the full scholarships. 

Trisha 

She they were blown away and and she had done all of this work. 

Trisha 

Through music toward the nursing profession and it, it made a huge difference, a huge difference. 

Trisha 

And she had lots of great questions in her application when she interviewed and things like that. 

Trisha 

But for someone who wants to play and who wants to or major, it really depends on the level. 

Trisha 

Of the school. 

Kamila 

And one question about you mentioned how like law schools and medical schools are recruiting music students ’cause they can see the. 

Kamila 

I guess this killing their ability to learn skill in their discipline. 

Kamila 

Is it the same for like you applying to undergrad as a high schooler, or obviously like colleagues are not going to see like a decrease in like supply of certain student ’cause they’re not looking for specific student like medical school and law school are, but like, are they also like looking at? 

Kamila 

Students with music and saying, like, oh, they’re definitely capable if they come to ours. 

Trisha 

Yeah yeah, but you have to make sure that they know that about you right? 

Trisha 

So a lot of kids don’t realize that applying to college is really. 

Trisha 

A project in marketing and they you know and they have to. 

Trisha 

They have to understand that they’re kind of selling themselves to the school and so having that musical experience be a common thing. 

Trisha 

That in their in their application can make a huge difference, especially when they can articulate some of the things that we’ve been talking about. 

Trisha 

So when they can say, you know that they that they know how to learn a skill if you’re. 

Trisha 

Applying to a. 

Trisha 

Program where skill learning is important, or research or being able to. 

Trisha 

To work independently, all of these things. 

Trisha 

If you can articulate that you know how to do these things because you’ve been playing the Viola since you were nine, then, then you’re already ahead of the game, because they will see that you know that how to be successful as a student at. 

That’s cool. 

Kamila 

Alright, so let’s go through the the different like. 

Kamila 

I guess we can. 

Kamila 

Say major God. 

Kamila 

I I was freaked out by my own voice there, alright, so let’s. 

Kamila 

Go through the. 

Kamila 

Let’s go through the major component of a music resume and like let’s stick it to the level that like I said, my friends are there. 

Kamila 

They’ve been playing for a very long time to take private lessons. 

Kamila 

And they do stuff outside of school as well. 

Kamila 

And like I wouldn’t say like my school is competitive musically and I don’t really know where we fall. 

Kamila 

But like you got some pretty good musicians like one of my class. 

Trisha 

That’s good. 

Kamila 

Yeah, one of my classmates, he he plays the clarinet now and I’m sure he’s going to be applying to us like conservatories like Juilliard. 

Kamila 

I think his sister got into Juilliard. 

Kamila 

What’s the other school starts this year? 

Kamila 

With the C. 

Trisha 

So Curtis, you’re probably thinking it’s planted in Philadelphia. 

Kamila 

Hurtis yes yeah. 

Kamila 

She either got into Juilliard, yeah, Juilliard or Curtis. 

Kamila 

So like there are some decent musicians at my school so we can talk about that level. 

Kamila 

And then what would be in their music resume when they’re applying to? 

Kamila 

Like a lot of them. 

Kamila 

In my school, during me applying to top schools. 

Kamila 

So I imagine like they’ll be applying to like the music programs there as well. 

Kamila 

So let’s talk about the different components #1. When should you start like? What’s an appropriate time to start an instrument so that you get to the level that you need to be before you apply to college? 

Trisha 

Well, well. 

Trisha 

I would definitely say for the average person some point in elementary school it almost doesn’t matter as far as as long as you’re able to play. 

Trisha 

Once you hit high school. 

Trisha 

That said, I have worked with people. 

Trisha 

I’m a I’m a professional flutist. 

Trisha 

I have taught students who have gone on to music school who started the flute when they were like a sophomore in college. 

Trisha 

They worked their tail off and they were amazing and they worked really hard. 

Trisha 

So I mean that can be done. 

Trisha 

But top flutist in the one of the most famous flutist in the world anyway, at one point said that no one should start an instrument before. 

Trisha 

14 or 16 years old and everybody. 

Trisha 

Was like are you crazy but? 

Trisha 

It’s because he could. 

Trisha 

Start then and and succeed so you know it. 

 Trisha 

It almost doesn’t matter, especially if you have a drive for it. 

Trisha 

But if there are parents listening who are wondering when to start, I would say start as as you know by by 3rd or 4th grade would be amazing. 

Trisha 

5th or 6th would be great and and take it. 

Trisha 

From there, if they are in middle school and they. 

Trisha 

They are playing an instrument, but they don’t have private teacher. 

Trisha 

Then now start getting a private teacher. 

Trisha 

You know in middle school that’s don’t don’t wait any longer. 

Trisha 

That’s a good time to to catch up if you haven’t so so so. 

Trisha 

Uhm, you know I have. 

Trisha 

I have. 

Trisha 

I’ve had clients who come to me like that. 

Trisha 

That young woman who was like I didn’t know I’d want to go to music school. 

Trisha 

And now I went to camp and I love it. 

Trisha 

So we were, we we, we raced, uh. 

Trisha 

Around you know in September of her senior year, to put some things together to give her a good competitive edge and make it possible to go. 

Trisha 

But for for the average average musicians in a really good music program like the school you’re talking about, they’re they’re. 

Trisha 

They’re all set. 

Trisha 

If they’ve been in there. 

Trisha 

They’ve been taking private lessons, and they’ve they’ve gotten into a Youth Orchestra or something outside of school, and if they have been in the ensemble through high school, then that’s a really great start, so they’re in good shape regardless of what you’re doing. 

Kamila 

And you’ve been mentioning private lessons and I understand they. 

Kamila 

Can help you but. 

Kamila 

Like, what exactly does a private lesson do in terms of building or music resume like it can help you become a better musician. 

Kamila 

I know that, but is it more for you to be more disciplined, or does it actually have some weight when you show that you’ve been like taking private like? 

Kamila 

Or do you even write that you’ve taken private lessons on your resume? 

Trisha 

Yeah, and you missed. 

Trisha 

Your teachers on your on your resume, you list your private instructors and if you’ve attended any masterclasses, you list those people as well and you list your conductors on there. 

Trisha 

So if you’ve been in Allstate for example, you would list your conductors. 

Trisha 

All of these things show what level you’re at, and taking private instruction. 

Trisha 

Then also makes it possible for you to win these kinds of things. 

Trisha 

It makes it. 

Trisha 

Possible for you? 

Trisha 

To get first chair if you’re not taking private lessons, especially on some of the more popular instruments. 

Trisha 

You’re just not going to. 

Trisha 

You’re not going to be the top one in your. 

Trisha 

School you’re not going to get into Allstate, you. 

Kamila 

Is it like? 

Kamila 

The discipline or something? 

Kamila 

Or do they? 

Trisha 

Yes, and the and the specific. 

Trisha 

The very specific training it’s training. 

Trisha 

So when you’re taking. 

Trisha 

Well, I’m a flutist, so when you’re taking a flute lesson, for example, I mean, we get down to hand position. 

Trisha 

We get down to really discussing how to use your body to get the best tone and we have exercises that help to develop their their embouchure, which is how they get their sound out so that they get a good sound, and so that they can control their phrasing and do. 

Trisha 

All of the artistry, I mean private instruction, is where you get really in depth into the art form. 

Trisha 

And into your own specific skill level for that art form for that instrument for that craft. 

Trisha 

And it’s essential it’s it’s absolutely essential. 

Trisha 

You don’t get that level of 1 on one instruction, and that level of skill building without private lessons. 

Kamila 

And as I know, for my own musical ventures in elementary school that didn’t last very long, I know that this stuff is like really expensive. 

Kamila 

If you’re not like singing, if you’re playing like an actual instrument, getting the instrument, even if you like rent one, it’s expensive, and I’m sure the lessons are expensive too, so like. 

Kamila 

Is there a way to actually pursue music in that way if you don’t come from a financially like advantage household? 

Trisha 

Well, for people who are in a very very disadvantaged household, there are often community programs. 

Trisha 

That can help them. 

Trisha 

To to pursue music and there’s lots of great programs, especially in major cities around the country, but beyond that. 

Trisha 

I have worked with some very not advantage families very very. 

Trisha 

Not wealthy families who struggle and as a family. 

Trisha 

When this when the student decides that they wanted to pursue. 

Trisha 

Uh music as their one thing then the family makes it happen. 

Trisha 

They commit to it. 

Trisha 

So I mean, I’ve had students who have. 

Trisha 

I’m I’m thinking of one young man who wanted a flute. He wanted to buy a high end flute at the time, the amount that he wanted to spend was $4000. 

Trisha 

And so he. 

Trisha 

He he was so committed to it that he got a summer job and put that money towards a flute and he for for every 

Trisha 

Birthday and holiday for a couple of years, he told everybody I’m saving up for a flute. 

Trisha 

Please don’t buy me a present, please if you could give me cash towards my food and that kid paid for. 

Trisha 

His own food. 

Trisha 

So it can be done. 

Trisha 

It can absolutely be done. 

Trisha 

It’s just with a little ingenuity. 

Trisha 

Yes, there are programs that will help to purchase purchase a a nicer instrument, but there are also there are also. 

Trisha 

And there are scholarships to help pay for the private instruction at certain in certain communities, but there’s. 

Trisha 

There’s always a way. 

Trisha 

There’s always a way. 

Kamila 

Alright, so let’s go into choosing your instrument again. 

Kamila 

Some instruments are more popular than others. 

Kamila 

I don’t know if I don’t know if I’m saying this wrong, but I’m sure like clarinet, for example, is like really popular, whereas like a bassoon is like not that. 

Kamila 

In terms of like amount of people who play it so, and this is more so for the parents and maybe more so for the maybe for the kids as well. 

Kamila 

But when your child is like I want to pursue music like I want to try playing an instrument and they’re like, oh, I really want to take it seriously, like I really want to try. 

Kamila 

And, you know, build yourself up till high school. 

Kamila 

It like is it better to choose an instrument that’s less popular and become really good at that? 

Kamila 

Because I feel like you’d have to work harder to make yourself stand out as someone who plays a clarinet versus someone who plays like a bassoon. 

Kamila 

Right? 

Trisha 

So probably your clarinet man should move to New Hampshire, because when you say clarinet. 

Trisha 

I almost laughed. 

Trisha 

Because it’s like no one plays the clarinet here. 

Trisha 

I don’t know. 

Trisha 

Yeah yeah, OK, everyone plays the violin and the flute. 

Kamila 

Oh oh Violet, for sure. 

Kamila 

That’s definitely the most popular one, yeah? 

Trisha 

Yeah, yeah. 

Trisha 

But the violin there’s so many violinists in. 

Trisha 

An orchestra that’s a little different. 

Trisha 

Percentage so I owned a music school for 22 years and and parents would ask that question all the time and. 

Trisha 

Really, what it comes down to if if a student is very, very interested in a particular instrument. 

Trisha 

If if some kid in your town heard the top, the top clarinetist from your school play and was. 

Trisha 

Blown away and just wanted to do. 

Trisha 

That then they will do well on the clarinet and pushing them toward the Viola will not help them, so they they very likely would never get good at the bassoon, for example, because they wanted to play the clarinet. 

Trisha 

So the first thing is to do what the kid wants. 

Trisha 

If the kid is attracted to a particular instrument, then that’s what they’re going to want to do. 

Trisha 

And it’ll be easier to get them to learn that instrument and to excel at that instrument. 

Trisha 

So that’s the first thing. 

Trisha 

Once they get going and and a lot of times music teachers, especially in the school system, will say. 

Trisha 

You know you’re really good at. 

Trisha 

The at the clarinet, but we need an Oval player and maybe you’d like to try the oboe and then the kid might say no way and another kid might say absolutely and that could give them some advantage. 

Trisha 

So you’re you’re right, there are instruments that very generally speaking. 

Trisha 

There’s there are fewer of out there, but. 

Trisha 

But you might not get good at that one if you don’t. 

Trisha 

If you don’t like it, you know. 

Trisha 

What I mean so? 

Trisha 

So so part of it. 

Trisha 

So it’s it’s kind of a combination. 

Trisha 

If a kid is like I don’t know, should I play the trumpet? 

Trisha 

Or the toolbar? 

Trisha 

I would say why don’t you go with tuba ’cause not so many people play the tuba and every school needs a really strong tuba section. 

Trisha 

You know one of my earliest clients was a. 

Trisha 

Tubist is that what we call them? 

Trisha 

I don’t even know, but she played. 

Trisha 

It was a young woman who played the tuba and in her state she was all state level for several years on the tuba and she was going to school for engineering and her parents had no financial need and. 

Trisha 

They were like. 

Trisha 

Help us please and we got her a big honking scholarship to play tuba. 

Trisha 

In the in the in a big engineering school, so it made it made a huge difference. 

Trisha 

You know? 

Trisha 

I don’t know that she would have gotten that if. 

Trisha 

She played the flute. 

Trisha 

Yeah, right? 

Kamila 

Alright, this is kind of like. 

Kamila 

Random question that popped off my head but and I should ask my friends this. 

Kamila 

I don’t know why I’m not asking them, but clarinet versus oboe. 

Kamila 

It looks really similar. 

Kamila 

I hear that the oboe is much harder to play. 

Kamila 

Like my friend. 

Kamila 

She plays the oboe. 

Kamila 

She’s like Oh my God, my core. 

Kamila 

It hurts so much or. 

Kamila 

Something like that. 

Kamila 

Yeah, what makes the oboe much harder to play than the clarinet? 

Kamila 

’cause they both have reads, but they’re like different. 

Kamila 

Because the oboe you just blow on the read, whereas the clarinet you have the read attached to the actual instrument. 

Trisha 

Yeah, so they have different kinds of rates. 

Trisha 

The clarinet has hold on. 

Trisha 

I think you gave me your. 

Kamila 

Did I give you my sickness? 

Kamila 

Through the screen. 

Trisha 

I think you gave me your sickness through the screen. 

Trisha 

Yeah, that’s some powerful germs, yeah, so the. 

Trisha 

So the clarinet has like. 

Trisha 

A hollow mouthpiece with a straight read. 

Trisha 

That closes it. 

Trisha 

So when you. 

Trisha 

Go into the clarinet, you’re just you’re I don’t want to say just every instrument is difficult and has its challenges, but you’re it. 

Trisha 

Someone like me could grab a clarinet. 

Trisha 

Mouthpiece and make a honking sound on it because. 

 Trisha 

Yeah, yeah. 

Trisha 

You just, you just have to get that thing to vibrate. 

Trisha 

The oboe is a double Reed, and so if you want to play around with a double Reed, take a a straw and like. 

Trisha 

Crush it and cut the edges just a little bit. 

Trisha 

And see if you can make it squawk. 

Trisha 

So the double Reed is like that. 

Trisha 

It’s a, it’s a. 

Trisha 

It’s two pieces of Reed that are vibrating on each other. 

Trisha 

It takes unbelievable pressure because your embouchure has to close it open just right, and then it doesn’t want her to go through. 

Trisha 

With the flute I’m just blowing into the room, so there’s no. 

Trisha 

There’s no holding. 

Trisha 

Back the air. 

Trisha 

But with the oboe, it’s all about getting all of this pressure in exactly the right space while you’re holding this little Reed open. 

Trisha 

Just enough and getting it to vibrate, it’s it seems impossible. 

Trisha 

It seems impossible so. 

Trisha 

One of the things that happens with oboe players is they’ll be playing and at the end they have to exhale because all that pressure is still built up. 

Trisha 

For flutes like we can’t inhale enough. 

Trisha 

There’s nothing left to exhale when we’re playing ’cause there’s no resistance, we’re just. 

Trisha 

Blowing into the. 

Trisha 

Room so yeah, the clarinet is a single read like a saxophone. 

Trisha 

And the oboe is a double Reed, just like a bassoon too. 

Kamila 

OK, that that was just a wonder of mine. 

Kamila 

I’m wondering for years I have friends who play both instruments. 

Kamila 

Never knew why I never asked. 

Kamila 

Them, but anyways, let’s go back. 

The admission. 

Trisha 

To the question the addition. 

Trisha 

The additional issue for double Reed instrument players is that they make their own reads. 

Trisha 

It’s an art form. 

Kamila 

Yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah. 

Kamila 

Yeah, my friend like the care that she takes for her reads or like. 

Trisha 

Down well, it. 

Trisha 

I mean, it’s it’s a whole craft and they they have to make their own reads and then. 

 Trisha 

You know what a pressure they’re under if they have this one Reed. 

Trisha 

That just sounds amazing and they have a big audition coming up. 

Trisha 

You want to practice on that one so you can sound amazing, but you don’t want to wear it out because. 

Trisha 

You want to use it. 

Trisha 

For the audition and then Lord. 

Trisha 

Help you if you if you drop it. 

Trisha 

And it breaks or it cracks. 

Trisha 

And then you know they’re like they’re like. 

Trisha 

I can’t I I. 

Trisha 

Just ruined my audition. 

Trisha 

I don’t have a good. 

Trisha 

I mean it’s intense, its intense. 

Trisha 

I don’t know how they manage without a personal counselor to talk. 

Trisha 

I don’t have reads, I just have a fluid. 

Trisha 

I just put something together and it works just fine as long as I maintain it. 

Trisha 

Those reads, they scare the living daylights out of me and it, you know, I I know high end professional oboe players who play in symphonies in in New England and you know they they might have a week where they’re like. 

Trisha 

I just gotta sit and and make reads ’cause I can’t get one. 

Trisha 

Right right now and. 

Trisha 

So they’ll they’ll do. 

Trisha 

Work on reads intents. 

Kamila 

I’ll tell my friend that when she thinks about, you know, applying the music school and pursuing if she won’t spend a week of. 

Kamila 

Her life doing that. 

Kamila 

Alright, so going back to the questions we talked about, like when you should. 

Kamila 

Start what is like. 

Kamila 

How you should choose your instrument. 

Kamila 

So now going into high school. 

Kamila 

Your high school will most likely have a music program of itself, so. 

Kamila 

I mean can you discuss like I? 

Kamila 

I don’t think. 

Kamila 

It’s like hard to get into your own schools music program like. 

Trisha 

No it. 

Trisha 

Depends on the school and a lot of schools. 

Trisha 

You just sign up. 

Trisha 

From the band or. 

Kamila 

Yeah, that’s that’s what I mean. 

Trisha 

Looking straight flyer or Jasmine or whatever. 

Trisha 

It’s in every school has different policies. 

Trisha 

You know as far as you know, marching band or you might have to audition for the jazz band or some schools that have really big programs. 

Trisha 

They might have an orchestra and then a like a select. 

Trisha 

Orchestra of some sort or a concert band. 

Trisha 

A big wind band and I wouldn’t ensemble. 

Trisha 

So you would audition for that one. 

Trisha 

To get into those, but for the most part, you can simply sign up to be in your school music program. 

Trisha 

You know, ask, ask them what the requirements are. 

Trisha 

They might have specific playing levels that you’re expected to to do, but the the nice thing is that most music programs 

Trisha 

In schools, of course, every school is different, but it’s usually for credit and you get a grade, and they’re usually considered to be on the advanced side of the grading system, so that can be helpful, you know. 

Trisha 

To in your decision making as far as whether or not to do band but Lucas or whatever. 

Trisha 

But it doesn’t take much to sign up for your school music program, and you can catch up pretty well if you’re motivated to do so. 

Kamila 

And like I’m sure colleges, if your school has like a big music. 

Kamila 

I’m just saying in general, ’cause I think this is pretty much true for all colleges. 

Kamila 

It’s just like a general thing. 

Kamila 

If you’re it’s a college, knows your school, like if your school is pretty big and they get like a lot of applicants. 

Kamila 

From there, they’ll know about your school’s music program and know how like competitive it is within your own like. 

Kamila 

I guess like orchestra or whatever to like get first chair and stuff. 

Kamila 

So I think they’re familiar with that. 

Kamila 

So I I don’t really want to talk much about that. 

Kamila 

I want to talk about outside of school orchestras and like bands because I think that’s where it like really does make a difference. 

Kamila 

So where do you even begin to look at orchestras? 

Kamila 

Or like symphonies? 

 Kamila 

Whatever it may be outside your school, like when do you start? 

Kamila 

How difficult is it, et cetera. 

Trisha 

I’ll say every major city at least, but all over the country. 

Trisha 

There are these. 

Trisha 

Wonderful youth orchestras and their nonprofit organizations, and they’re always recruiting students for their programs. 

Trisha 

And they’re all different levels. 

Trisha 

So here in New England, there. 

Trisha 

There’s there’s like a really great one up in Portland, ME. 

Trisha 

And then there’s like some some. 

Trisha 

I mean, that was fairly competitive, and then there’s some less competitive ones between Maine and Boston. 

Trisha 

And then there’s this big one in Boston. 

Trisha 

So in your in your area. 

Trisha 

It’s not that hard to find out where the youth orchestras are and what level they’re at. 

Trisha 

Same with community choruses, and even if your town doesn’t have one. 

Trisha 

There’s often community bands, which is like the community, so if you’re not a high level, if you’re an intermediate trumpet player and you want to be in something outside of school, you could be in the the town community band that plays at Memorial Day or the 4th of July or something you know, and that can be something outside of school. 

Trisha 

That you did without an audition. 

Trisha 

But there are youth orchestras and community orchestra, community choir groups, student choir groups all over the country, the. 

Trisha 

Best resource for finding out is usually your private teacher. 

Trisha 

Your private teacher usually knows, and most of these. 

Trisha 

Groups market themselves to private teachers because that’s where the bulk of their students come from, and so your private teacher will know. 

Kamila 

Oh sorry, you like I thought you froze like you just stopped. 

Kamila 

So I was like alright OK so. 

Kamila 

Again, I don’t know how this works, like I barely know how athletics work, so you know, I don’t know how music works at all. 

Kamila 

So with athletes like you go to counties and you go to states etc and you can get like awards there. 

Kamila 

And like I don’t think you can get individual awards like if you’re on the cross country team for example, I think. 

Kamila 

It’s like your school wins. 

Kamila 

But I’m sure you could like mention that you were like the fastest one on your like resume with music when you’re playing in, and I don’t know about schools like what kind of awards they do that I think they just perform like a couple times a year. 

Kamila 

But for like orchestras outside of school. 

Kamila 

That are well established and that colleges will know, especially if you’re in a major city. 

Kamila 

Are there awards associated with that? 

Kamila 

Like, do you? 

Kamila 

How does the competition go in like the across like orchestras across like the United States? 

Kamila 

Are there competitions you know when do they happen? 

Kamila 

What kind of awards do you receive? 

Kamila 

And do you ever get special mentions? 

Kamila 

If you, for example like play a solo in that concert? 

Trisha 

Huh, yeah, those are great questions. 

Trisha 

So it varies by instrument. 

Trisha 

You know there are. 

Trisha 

There are solo competitions for it, like there’s some very famous ones for for violin and for piano world famous ones that people all over would know about. 

Trisha 

And then there’s like community ones and smaller ones and and pretty much. 

Trisha 

Every state solo competitions. 

Trisha 

Often they’re run by either a nonprofit or by a. 

Trisha 

The music educators of the of the state might have a music educator solo festival where you can win. 

Trisha 

Parts for the Symphony orchestras. 

Trisha 

The the youth, orchestras and youth choirs and those kinds of things. 

Trisha 

Those are usually by audition. 

Trisha 

So when you put it on your resume, you can list that you were selected. 

Trisha 

You were one of 14 violins selected to perform to be in this ensemble. 

Trisha 

So, so the fact that. 

Trisha 

You got in is kind of the award, and so when we’re creating the resume, we make sure that it’s listed that way, so that if you’re applying to something outside of your area, they can see that, oh, it’s a. 

Trisha 

Yeah oh they took. 

Trisha 

They took 4 flutes and so they wanted 4 flutes chosen to do this. 

Trisha 

This concert series or whatever it is and so you can. 

Trisha 

There’s when we’re working on the music resume, we find ways to take the things that you’ve done and to get it so that it can be clear on the resume. 

Trisha 

So we kind of. 

Trisha 

It’s it’s sort of crafted for you. 

Trisha 

For the each specific student, so you know if you if you one of the things that we include in the music resume is a whole page of repertoire, which is the music that’s written for your instrument. 

Trisha 

So if you got to play a major. 

Trisha 

Symphony if you’re a Piccolo player and you got to play the New World Symphony, for example, everybody everybody in the music department at any school knows about the piccolo part on the New World Symphony. 

Trisha 

And so when you have your repertoire list, and you say that you will pick a little player with the Boston Youth Symphony and on there it says that he played. 

Trisha 

Dvorak’s New World Symphony. They’d be like, oh, I know exactly what that is. I know exactly what level they must be at to have been able to do that, so we can we communicate the things that you have won or that you have earned. We can find ways to communicate it in your. 

Trisha 

On your resume, including. 

Trisha 

The large ensemble work. 

Trisha 

By audition and chamber ensembles, those are small groups that you might audition for or be selected for any solo work that you’ve done. 

Trisha 

So if you did a solo recital, or if you were participating in a solo recital from the music school you attend, or your private teacher where have you all? 

Trisha 

All of those we we list right on there. 

Trisha 

One of the awards I set some notes here from. 

Trisha 

From from your questions, but one of the words that you might win is a scholarship, and so we list the scholarship, winning things and all of them count. 

Trisha 

I was working with a young woman who won a scholarship that was it was public. 

Trisha 

It was called like the Tuesday Music Ladies Lunch Scholarship or something like that. 

Trisha 

It had a very funny name. 

Trisha 

And in her little. 

Trisha 

Town there were these very fancy ladies. 

Trisha 

They were all retired ladies and they loved music and they had like music, lunches on Tuesdays or something and every year they would raise some money and they would have this scholarship that they would give to a local student who. 

Trisha 

Was going to college. 

Trisha 

I’m going to play music in college. 

Trisha 

And so it was like $400.00 or $500.00 or something, right? And when the the client was like, oh, I don’t really have scholarships to list. 

Trisha 

And she said, oh, I only have this Tuesday lady’s color and it was like what is that? So she told me what? 

Trisha 

It was and. 

Trisha 

I’m like you. 

Trisha 

Won so we list it because then people know that the. 

Trisha 

That the people in your community. 

Trisha 

I gave you money to support what you’re doing. It doesn’t matter that it was $500.00. You don’t even have to say how much it was, but any of those little opportunities any of those little you you know, if you want a scholarship to be in the Youth Orchestra. 

Trisha 

If you want some, a lot of music programs in high schools, public schools, they have little scholarships to take private. 

Trisha 

Lessons or a scholarship to attend a music camp from a scholarship to buy to put towards a new instrument. 

Trisha 

If you won one of those, then we listed on your resume so that because that just shows that you’re someone. 

Trisha 

That people already. 

Trisha 

Already support, they already feel like you’re. 

Trisha 

You’re going somewhere and so that’s important to communicate so. 

Kamila 

All right, so you get a great job of explaining, like the different awards and like especially playing like a certain instrument in a certain like Symphony. 

Kamila 

That can be really impressive because the people who play music note but like the difficulty of that. 

Trisha 

Yeah, yeah. 

Kamila 

Is that what I was? 

Kamila 

I think this is. 

Kamila 

I think this is. 

Kamila 

I heard this from my choir friend, but I’m sure it applies to people who play in symphonies and orchestras. 

Kamila 

There’s like competitions and there are like judges and they give you a score and there are like other like maybe a couple other schools competing. 

Kamila 

So when you have. 

Kamila 

What is like? 

Kamila 

Is there a competition between like symphonies? 

Kamila 

What are the scores the judges give you mean like is that a score for the overall or did they give like oh the violins were playing particularly well? 

Kamila 

Cellos were lacking a bit. 

Kamila 

I don’t know stuff like do they like how does it look like when you’re actually at a competition and there are judges giving you marks on your orchestra. 

Kamila 

Or your choir. 

Trisha 

I love that question, so yeah. 

Trisha 

There’s all kinds of competitions and and those, so those ensemble competitions. 

Trisha 

They also have them from marching band and they haven’t filled with passion and they have them for you know when when d’ensemble or what have you leaving him for theater, like your theater group can go perform part of their flag at a play festival and those. 

Trisha 

Kind of things so. 

Trisha 

Part of it is a critique, and every group every organization has a different scoring system or whatnot so you know you might get a 5 star performance, or you might get a four rating like they you know they call them all different things and so it it it. 

Trisha 

It’s almost a moot point, but. 

Trisha 

They they. 

Trisha 

They always have something to do with the whole ensemble, and there’s a whole system that they include in it so they would talk about intonation and the choice of repertoire. 

Trisha 

And all of these things. 

Trisha 

But if there was a solo, someone might get a special commendation for having an outstanding solo within a piece that they played. 

Trisha 

So when you list. 

Trisha 

When you list. 

Trisha 

That band, so you could say you know my the Triton High school band One five star rating at the music educator, Massachusetts instrumental and Choral conducting association. 

Trisha 

Either you put down the name of the thing and you say that one a 5 star rating and I got a special commendation. 

Trisha 

Whatever they call it. 

Trisha 

At that festival for my solo in X piece so you can list that on your resume. And if you didn’t get a solo then you still could say as a bullet point under the ensemble that you and you still could say that we competed at such and such and won A5. 

Trisha 

Grading so that they see what your level is and they see the music department at that college will see that you know you’ve been active in a band you were playing, first chair or second chair in a band that’s winning these kinds of things like clearly you’re more experienced than someone who wasn’t in band in school. 

Kamila 

And then just one other question to do with competitions. 

Kamila 

You know, I’m from Maryland. 

Kamila 

So Baltimore Youth Symphony Orchestra. 

Kamila 

My friends are. 

Kamila 

All of my friends, right? 

Kamila 

So like does. 

Kamila 

For example, the Baltimore Youth Symphony Orchestra. 

Kamila 

Do they ever compete with, let’s say like the Boston Youth Symphony Orchestra? 

Kamila 

Like, is there ever national competitions? 

Trisha 

Uhm, I don’t know of 1, but let’s start one that would be so fun. 

Kamila 

Oh really, my passion. 

Trisha 

Wouldn’t that be fun? 

Trisha 

Yeah, sure, I’ll. 

Kamila 

I’ll I’ll call my friends, it’ll ask them if they would like flighting. 

Trisha 

Let’s get that planet. 

Trisha 

We could get people. 

Trisha 

The youth orchestras from all over the country to come to one place and have them all do a festival. 

Trisha 

That would be nice. 

Kamila 

I feel like that. 

Kamila 

I thought that kind of thing would exist, like I mean there are national robotics competitions where like all over I would think like music is a pretty big thing like they would have something like that. 

Trisha 

Yeah, they have more. 

Trisha 

Of that, for solo players or for chamber groups. 

Trisha 

And I think logistically it’s just easier to bring, you know, a trio or a solo to a competition somewhere in the country than. 

Kamila 

Oh, that’s true. 

Trisha 

It is to to. 

Kamila 

Then it’s cool. 

Trisha 

To loading your orchestra and travel across the country. 

Trisha 

Although a lot of the school public schools. 

Trisha 

Will do that. 

Trisha 

And they a lot of schools will take their ensembles too. 

Trisha 

To a uh. 

Trisha 

A festival and but but the youth orchestras don’t typically do that, but they do tons of stuff that’s really high end anyway, so it might not be necessary, but we’ll think we’ll think about it, maybe. 

Trisha 

We’ll start it. 

Kamila 

Alright, so in another line that’s not my last question. 

Kamila 

So if you, let’s say, play the clarinet for example, are there like statewide national wide competitions specifically for your instrument? 

Kamila 

’cause I think you mentioned that, but we didn’t elaborate on that. 

Trisha 

Yeah, so I don’t know the ends and outs of every single instrument, but there are. 

Trisha 

I know for flute, for example, the National Flute Association has some competitions. 

Trisha 

The Greater Boston there used to be a group called the Greater Boston Food Association that had. 

Trisha 

Like competition festival types of things flu talk magazine used to have one so I I don’t know where they all are at this point, but especially post COVID. 

Trisha 

But there there are lots of organizations for each instrument, and they often have private or solo competitions for that. 

Trisha 

Instrument various types and you know I tell my clients to just take every audition. 

Trisha 

Just take every audition, just do it. 

Trisha 

It gets easy. 

Trisha 

After you’ve been doing it for a while and you know if you win. 

Trisha 

If you, if you win a 5 star rating or if you win, you know an A in New Hampshire, there’s a solo festival that the music educators run, and if you play really well, you get an A rating. 

Trisha 

Then next is the B rating or whatnot. 

Trisha 

There are some that do gold, silver, bronze, whatever, so to be able to say that you participated in anything and one. 

Trisha 

When first prize or won a gold rating or those kinds of things that just shows a different level of of commitment and expertise. 

Trisha 

And so I say, do them all but your private teacher would be the one who knows best about what options are open to you in your area. 

Kamila 

All right, so I want to get into like a couple last things before we wrap up here. 

Kamila 

So number one is you definitely mentioned scholarships a lot. 

Kamila 

I use in our e-mail chain. 

Trisha 

It’s it’s. 

Kamila 

You’ve also discussed scholarships like meshing them as well, so can you tell? 

Kamila 

We do most like. 

Kamila 

Is it kind of like I don’t know, like an athletic scholarship, to get a music scholarship at merit based schools? 

Kamila 

Is it pretty much the same kind of process? 

Trisha 

Huh, yeah, it’s very similar and it’s, you know, just like with athletics, it depends on what they need that year, you know so. 

Trisha 

So if they don’t, if they’re if they’re looking at their orchestra and they realize that they’re short on cellos and and you come along, and you’ve played in Allstate and you did a summer music program. 

Trisha 

Then you you know you can take private lessons and all these things. 

Trisha 

The the the. 

Trisha 

That information you start a conversation with the music. 

Trisha 

Department about that stuff. 

Trisha 

So even before you start applying to the. 

Trisha 

School and you find out what the options are, what the opportunities are, and you send them all of your stuff and you talk to the cello professor and you talked to the orchestra conductor and you say you know I play the cello and I I want to come to your school. 

Trisha 

And they might be like, oh, we don’t have many cellos. 

Trisha 

What have you got up your sleeve and they might hear heavy play and those kinds of things, and so it’s not well, I guess it’s not the same every year, but that’s the same with sports, right? 

Trisha 

That they don’t need, uh, if they don’t need a specific. 

Trisha 

If they don’t need, uh, I can’t even say a position on a team if they don’t need a picture. 

Trisha 

Came up with the position. 

Trisha 

They don’t need a picture if they’ve got really high end pictures right now, then they’re not going to be going around recruiting to give somebody scholarship money to pitch in their softball team with their baseball team, right? 

Trisha 

So so but they. 

Trisha 

The music department, just like the Athletic department music departments at many schools. 

Trisha 

Of course, every school is. 

Trisha 

Different, but at many schools music departments. 

Trisha 

A budget and if they know that we’ve got to get it shallow in here and they find out that you’re what they need, then they might just say here we’re going to. 

Trisha 

We’ll give you this much money if. 

Trisha 

You will play. 

Trisha 

The cello in. 

Trisha 

Our school I one of my very first. 

Trisha 

I think she was. 

Trisha 

My she was my client before I had started. 

Trisha 

My business music both lives and. 

Trisha 

I just I was just working with her because I knew all of. 

Trisha 

This stuff and. 

Trisha 

She wanted to go to school for. 

Trisha 

On the field hockey scholarship, and she did all of the field hockey things and she everybody knew that she was going to go on a field hockey scholarship. 

Trisha 

She won the right stuff she was like and when he came down to it, she just wasn’t. 

Trisha 

No one, no one looked at her and she not only was she not. 

Trisha 

Offered a scholarship. 

Trisha 

But she wasn’t even offered any opportunities to play. 

Trisha 

And she was a. 

Trisha 

Really high end field hockey player. 

Trisha 

But at that point they did. 

Trisha 

The competition was intense and they just. 

Trisha 

Didn’t have the the. 

Trisha 

Need and in the meantime I was forcing her to keep her music resume up to date and to put certain things on it and to go do certain activities so that and I forced her to send her stuff to the music departments and all these things and she. 

Trisha 

Chose a school and sent all this stuff to the music department and they called her at home and without even an audition they said this was a flute streamlined without even an audition they. 

Trisha 

Said to her. 

Trisha 

We need a flutist for our orchestra. 

Trisha 

If you’ll play in the orchestra will give you full tuition. 

Trisha 

And she called me and said I was hoping. 

Trisha 

To let me play in the. 

Trisha 

Orchestra, right, but instead she went to. 

Trisha 

School on a on a. 

Trisha 

Music scholarship to study business. 

Trisha 

That is a small liberal arts college, but they didn’t have a good flute player and she, she she was, and so they so she got a scholarship and she got to play in the orchestra. 

Trisha 

Couple years. 

Kamila 

Damn damn should have planned instrument alright anyway. 

Kamila 

Anyways, one thing that I forgot to like follow up when you mentioned this earlier, but when music departments don’t reach out like athletic departments, I know I’ve interviewed like student athletes at schools, even like top schools. 

Kamila 

And they would tell me the recruiting process coaches would come to them, watch them play, talk to them afterwards and that’s how they would contact them and start. 

Kamila 

Like you know, talking back and forth. 

Trisha 

I thought you should. 

Kamila 

But if music departments don’t reach out, what exactly do you have to do on your end? 

Kamila 

Do you just send? 

Kamila 

An e-mail to like I don’t know. 

Kamila 

The band director of the school that you want to play do. 

Kamila 

Do you need to be introduced like what? 

Kamila 

How do you even like? 

Kamila 

Begin to. 

Kamila 

Ask to be in their music program. 

 Trisha 

It’s much less, UM, it’s much different and less similar at each school than the athletic stuff is. 

Trisha 

There’s a real system for the athletics, you know, for music degree programs. 

Trisha 

If you want to go study music, there are some Deans of music departments who will go to college fairs or things like that. 

Trisha 

And and talk. 

Trisha 

Up the school, talk up the program, but they’re really not going to. 

Trisha 

To show up at your orchestra concert and that just doesn’t. 

Trisha 

It just doesn’t happen like that. 

Trisha 

What does happen though, is that and. 

Trisha 

And let’s talk about studying music as a degree. 

Trisha 

What does happen is that in many instances the private teacher, the private instrument professor at the school, had a lot of say in whether or not they teach a particular student. 

Trisha 

And So what I and so this is what music build lives, is all about. 

Trisha 

I’ve always coaching students on how to talk to people at the music department, how to figure out whom to talk to, how to, how to reach out to them, what to send them, what to say. 

Trisha 

And so one thing to always do is if you have a professor and I have to say that for someone who’s going to study music to become a music, a performance major at a school. 

Trisha 

Probably the single most important element of the college is your private instructor. You’re going to do all of your one-on-one training. 

Trisha 

With that person. 

Trisha 

So you want to know that it’s the right fit and they want to know too? 

Trisha 

Like they don’t want to teach you if they can’t teach you, you know so. 

Trisha 

I urge my students to go to masterclasses and now it’s even a little bit easier because some of them are online, so you can at least participate online if not attend in person. 

Trisha 

But to go to masterclasses where these people are teaching and to have actual conversation with the person and see if you can play for them. 

Trisha 

See if you can have a. 

Trisha 

Private lesson with them. 

 Trisha 

See if you can. 

Trisha 

Just really start a relationship so that so that the school knows that you’re someone that they want to teach, and then yeah, you send your resume to in your repertoire list to the chairman of the department, or to the person who who conducts the ensemble that you’re interested in, and make sure that they know that you’re. 

Trisha 

Interested make sure that you’re. 

Trisha 

That that you’re at the right level and that you’re talking and filling in need it. 

Trisha 

That’s how to do it so the students do that and you could just imagine how much sophistication it takes for a student. 

Trisha 

You know someone who’s applying for you know biology. 

Trisha 

They’re not. 

Trisha 

They’re not reaching out like this, so the music students. 

Trisha 

Get good at doing this and those are the ones who end up getting really great opportunities. 

Trisha 

So we music students end up being the ones who are doing the reaching out and getting the information to the right people. 

 Trisha 

And telling them who who they are. 

Kamila 

Alright, so there’s one more thing I want to discuss before we wrap up is the time commitment that it takes for music. 

Trisha 

Right? 

Trisha 

OK. 

Kamila 

You know, athletics if you want to be the top and you want to play like. 

Kamila 

Do you like at one of the top schools in football? 

Kamila 

You got to work your ***** off. 

Kamila 

Same for music and I will tell I again I have music friends so I know the time commitment. 

Kamila 

It takes one that clarinet like my classmate who plays the clarinet. 

Kamila 

I said his sister older sister played the bassoon and she went to like either Juilliard Curtis, one of one of those two right. 

Kamila 

And like I didn’t hear from him directly, but I heard it from one of our mutual. 

Kamila 

His family, they constantly moved around to get a high school, which ended up being our high school. 

Kamila 

A high school that had a good enough music program for her. 

Kamila 

They were costly moving around as she was constantly playing and like people were visiting her and she was going and like the amount of effort, not just her but her whole family put into and I think This is why he was. 

Kamila 

Pushed into music as well, but the whole like effort that their family put into just getting their daughter to like one of these top Juilliard occurs one of them. 

Kamila 

Yeah, this top school was like immense. 

Kamila 

So and my even my friend, who’s an oboe player. 

Kamila 

She’s like like should I do it? 

Kamila 

Should I major in it? 

Kamila 

Should I just keep it? 

Kamila 

As a hobby for the rest of my life. 

Kamila 

So much time in like committed hours and you’re like so frustrated that you can’t play this like line correctly and you just for like hours and hours. 

Trisha 

Thank you. 

Kamila 

You said so. 

Kamila 

If you want to be in music, can you explain like what is the time commitment to true? 

Kamila 

Because each instrument will have its difficulty, there’s no like one really easy instrument. 

Kamila 

Can you say like what is like the time commitment that you need? 

Kamila 

If you really want to create a really sophisticated music resume and just become a really good musician? 

Trisha 

Yeah, so I would say that the example that you gave is extreme. 

Trisha 

That’s very extreme. 

Kamila 

Oh, I know. 

Trisha 

That is not typical. 

Kamila 

Juilliard and Carnegie is like. 

Trisha 

That is not. 

Trisha 

Typical and it’s extreme and I I can say that I was just working with a client who’s just that. 

Trisha 

I’m just wrapping up with now who’s gone through the process. 

Trisha 

Who was I? 

Trisha 

I think a bit of an underdog and came to me in September, which was really, really late and. 

Trisha 

But he jumped through all the hoops and did all of the things and we chose. 

Trisha 

For very. 

Trisha 

Very wonderful music schools for him to apply to. 

Trisha 

Two of them are very excellent schools and. 

Trisha 

He did all the things and he got into all four of his schools with really, really wonderful scholarship options, which was a really great result. 

Trisha 

And and he’s probably. 

Trisha 

So, so I don’t. 

Trisha 

It’s an impossible question to. 

Trisha 

Answer I would say. 

Trisha 

That if you want to be a performer that you have to be doing the work every single day. 

Trisha 

We’ll put it that much and and. 

Trisha 

And when you get to college, you’ll you’ll work even more every single day. 

Trisha 

But that holds true with your biology class. 

Trisha 

You’re taking AP biology. 

Trisha 

You’re going to be working really hard right now every single day, and then when you go to college to study biology, you’re going to be working even harder and more every single day on biology, right? 

Trisha 

It’s the same with piano. 

Trisha 

It’s the same with everything you. 

Trisha 

You just have to. 

Trisha 

Really put. 

Trisha 

Smart time in and and. 

Trisha 

You know musicians just like athletes are prone to injury. 

Trisha 

And and to overuse problems. 

Trisha 

And so if you if you have a really great private teacher and I can’t stress that enough, then your private teacher. 

Trisha 

Will will help you to figure out. 

Trisha 

What amount of work is required for you to reach the goals that you want to reach? 

Trisha 

If your goal is to get into the Juilliard School, then your friends family did all the right things, right? 

Trisha 

But if your goal is to go to a great university and to be able to March in their gigantic marching band and to get a degree in clarinet and then go on to. 

Trisha 

Be able to have a career playing the clarinet then you know you can. 

Trisha 

You don’t have to go through the hoops that the Juilliard family went through. 

Trisha 

So, so the time commitment you know you hear these stories, you know at Juilliard you practice 8 hours a day. 

Trisha 

If if if I practiced the flute 8 hours a day, I would hurt myself. 

Trisha 

You know, like you you can. 

Trisha 

I know pianists, I have a colleague who, when I was in grad school, she’s a pianist, and she injured her wrists from practicing so much and she had to take a couple of years off. 

Kamila 

Bro Oh my God right? 

Trisha 

So, so it’s not just about the time, it’s about the intelligent work. 

Trisha 

Yeah, there’s a very famous flute flute professor in the little Trevor Y, and he says it’s about time. 

Trisha 

Patience and intelligent work. 

Trisha 

And and so I would, I would say that the answer is would be better found with their private teacher. 

Trisha 

You know somebody who’s it depends on your level. 

Trisha 

It depends on your goals. 

Trisha 

You know, but most of the professional musicians I know who are making a living are are practicing a few hours a day. 

Trisha 

And that’s as part of their profession. 

Trisha 

Practicing a few hours a day and then they’re in rehearsals for you know however, many hours a week and then they’re in concerts, so. 

Trisha 

It it, it definitely varies and. 

Trisha 

It depends on your instrument. 

Kamila 

Alright, so thank you very much for coming today. 

Kamila 

Have a good. 

Kamila 

Rest of the night. 

Trisha 

You too thank you you you rock, you’re awesome. 

Kamila 

Now you’re even bad. 

Kamila 

You made the interview OK, bye. 

Trisha 

You know you did. 

Kamila 

Alright, we both did. 

Kamila 

We both did. 

Trisha 

We rock, we rock it. 

Trisha 

I’ll see you later. 

Trisha 

Right, right, yeah? 

Trisha 

Thank you. 

Trisha 

Good luck, love, I feel better. 

Trisha 

Thank you. 

Kamila 

Thank you, that’s it for my episode with Trisha. 

Kamila 

I hope you enjoyed it as much as I did. 

Kamila 

I will leave the information for how to contact her down below in the description. 

Kamila 

Again, make sure you subscribe ’cause next week I’ll be releasing an interview with Ethan. 

Kamila 

And Ethan, he’s a high school senior. 

Kamila 

He’s not set on where he wants to go yet, but he did get into USC, UC Berkeley, and a bunch of other uses that I cannot remember right now. 

Kamila 

And he is currently deciding between USC and Chapman University. 

Kamila 

You do not want to miss that. 

Kamila 

And I hope to see you there.